200924-N-BQ121-000

Sailors assigned to Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry take the Navy-wide advancement exam in small groups at onboard Corry Station, Sept. 24. IWTC Corry Station is currently taking safety precautions against COVID-19 in order to safeguard its service members and families. 

PENSACOLA, Fla.

Sailors attached to Information Warfare Training Center Corry Station participated in Cycle 248 advancement exams for their assigned ratings, Sept. 9, 16 and 23.

The Navy-wide advancement exams take place for qualified enlisted Sailors E-3 to E-5 twice a year. The exams tests a Sailor's knowledge in in-rate training topics. Studying up-to-date bibliographies - available for download online is the key to success. A large percentage of the final multiple is obtained from a Sailor's performance mark average (PMA). PMAs are based on yearly and occasional evaluation reports in which Sailors are ranked amongst their peers by respective chains of command.

“This cycle adds additional challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictions that comes with it,” said Chief Information Systems Technician Alyeene Fleming, IWTC Corry Station education service officer. “Proctoring Cycle 248 has proven to be challenging with all the COVID protocols, but fortunately with the new NAVADMIN, we have room to ensure all Sailors are able to take the advancement exam.”

Fleming added, “Some of the changes include smaller exam groups, socially distancing during the exam and a change in the traditional exam schedule. The E-4 exam has also been historically the largest proctored exam, so the coordination burden has been reduced significantly. With the relaxed schedule, we are able to focus on administering to smaller groups and training more Sailors on how to use NSIPS.”

"I just need eight hours of sleep and bottle of water,” said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Cody Childress, an instructor at IWTC Corry Station. “I usually study the bibs, and my entry- level ELINT instructor guide because I can find a lot of the fundamentals that are questions on the exam.”

Prior to each advancement exam, the Navy Advancement Center releases bibliographies (bibs) for each rating exam which break down, in topics and subtopics, what will appear on the examinations. The bibs are intended for Sailors to utilize to narrow and organize their studies.

"Advancing to the next pay grade to earn more money to support my family is my biggest motivation," said Childress. "I’m not sure how I did on the exam but I hope that my strong evaluation can make up for what I lacked on the exam.”

The evaluation process makes up for a large portion of a service members PMA, or their overall score that determines their selection for the next rank.

For more information on the Navy-wide Advancement Exam, visit the Navy Advancement Center webpage at https://www.nko.navy.mil/group/navy-advancement-center.

IWTC Corry Station is a part of the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT). With four schoolhouse commands, a detachment, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains over 22,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community.

For more news from Center for Information Warfare Training domain, visit https://www.public.navy.mil/netc/centers/ciwt/, www.facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter.com/NavyCIWT.

 

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